Leaving Dana Point, CA

We left Dana Point at 12:47pm June 29, 2018.

The buckets are nailed to the dock to keep the overpopulation of sea lions off the docks and the boats.
The buckets are nailed to the dock to keep the overpopulation of sea lions off the docks and the boats.
We met our captain Nikolay Alexandrov, an enthusiastic, full of energy young man, and a native Bulgarian who gained experience in the Bulgarian navy and naval academy.  His stories provide much entertainment.  He brought along another crew member, John, who is a semi-retired boat captain with lots of experience over the last 40 years.  We knew we were in good hands.  The weather report looked especially fine for the sail up the coast; almost unprecedented good winds.....
until the sun went down. I lost my view of the horizon, and a few other things (!) that first night.  Everything is and continues to be fine, but I am not on the boat.  I have found out that I need to take the meds proactively because you can't catch up.  Saturday morning they turned the boat around and retraced our path to Santa Barbara, 3 hours behind us, so that I could get off.  The marina there didn't have a slip big enough for our boat, so we only had 15 minutes on the public dock to "dump" me off and be on their way.  I was a mess, and Dick felt awful about leaving me there, but we both wanted him to continue because this is such an incredible learning experience for him.  I sat on a bench for a while trying to equilibrate and find a nearby hotel.  As soon as I got to the room I threw my hat off and fell asleep for 12 hours.  Sunday I flew from Santa Barbara to Seattle, where our son Jeff lives.  I've been here ever since, awaiting Dick's arrival into Anacortes, just a bit north of here.  They expect to be there tomorrow afternoon and I can take an airport shuttle to meet them. Thank goodness for cell phones, Google maps, Uber, Trip Advisor and a sweetheart of a son to make everything easy and possible.

The Isla Z leaving Santa Barbara!
The Isla Z leaving Santa Barbara!

Dick has learned so much. Nikolay and John know much about how a boat works.  They have been going over all the working parts and have made improvements along the way.  Dick has participated in this process and found it to be both interesting and satisfying.  It's important to be able to fix things while cruising because help is not always available.  
Our boat salesman, James Leishman, who is part of the Leishman family that founded the Nordhavn company, and has been around boats his whole life, has emphasized that the trip from Baja, Mexico to Seattle is the roughest cruise in the world.  In his words it's horrible. The winds and swells come continuously from the NW, and you head into the swells and waves the whole trip.  It might not look rough, but if the swells come in short intervals, the boat bobs up and down like a cork.  Two foot swells at 2 seconds are worse than 5 foot swells at 15 seconds.  The area north of San Francisco is notorious for being particularly bad.  They experienced 10 foot swells at 10 second intervals, so I am very grateful to have spent the time on land and have no regrets.  We will be on protected inland waters while in Puget Sound and Canadian waters between Vancouver Island and the mainland.  I had no trouble there last year and I still look forward to a great summer. The return ride to Mexico is supposedly very pleasant.  All that works against you works with you going south. I'm not going to be discouraged!!.....and I've had a great chance to rest, relax and enjoy a visit with my son.  

View of the shipping canal and beyond from Jeffs condo
View of the shipping canal and beyond from Jeffs condo

Comments

JoAnne (Josephine) 7/11/2018
And I thought we were going to spend some quality time having Ocean Rolls....you just skipped over us and landed in SEA.... wish we could have seen you, but sounds like Dick is getting the full meal deal...what an experience!
Debbie 7/11/2018
you must be back on the boat by now.  I hope you are now loving it.  Have fun.